Assessment… a new sort of gradebook

December 14, 2008 at 11:14 pm 1 comment

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WHAT could authentic assessment look like in the classroom?

For four years I have been experimenting in my math classroom to replace percentage and letter grades with much more meaningful descriptive feedback.

There’s no shortage of percentage-based grade books for teachers. Punch in the numbers and out come the letter grades.assess_screen_02
Assignments built from learning targets with student self-assessmentassess_screen_04 They don’t tell the student what they need to do to improve… they don’t even tell the student what it is they have achieved.

They just divert the student’s attention with a meaningless letter grade from the essential tasks of learning. The frustrated and anxious student is left vainly to plead for extra credit in a bid to get more nonsense points.

The challenge is to create a gradebook that is not based on numbers and letters, but records descriptive progress and gives the student the sort of valuable feedback that describes just what it is they need to do to improve their learning.

Well, take a look at this powerpoint and let me know what you think.

The system is based on student-friendly learning targets. Assignments and questions are all linked to a learning target.

Against each assignment and learning target the teacher can record and feedback to the student a description — ranging from Starting through Getting it to Got it — and add a suggested revision learning target plus a customized study skill tip.

It also records the student’s own self-assessment of progress.

And rather than add up meaningless percentages, the system summarizes to what extent the teacher and student agree on their assessment of progress.

It can show a matrix of an individual student’s progress. Or, it can show, color-coded, the progress of an entire class.

Input screens allow the teacher to add questions (+ pictures, diagrams and equations), new targets, target notes and assignments — and link them together in a host of assignment designs.

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Entry filed under: Assessment + Grading, Student self-assessment, Thoughts from the classroom, What's on the PiFactory blog.... Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Competitive grading still sabotages good teaching Hope and change in my classroom

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Lisa  |  February 19, 2011 at 2:40 am

    This is an amazing grade book!!!! do you use the gradebook? I have been thinking along these lines but have been afraid of all of the work that it would take to develop such a tool.
    Is this software that you have written?
    Lisa

    Reply

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